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PRO PRODUCTS VERSUS DRUGSTORE PRODUCTS

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN PRO VERSUS DRUGSTORE PRODUCTS

Pantene will make the hair feel that way for about 4 or so months because the hair gets coated with wax, it's got a raincoat on, but that is a problem because hair is dead matter, just like a leather couch and with a leather couch you have to condition it so it stays supple and strong but if the moisture & protein can't get to the hair  because of the raincoat the hair has on, it will start to dry up within this incasement of wax and eventually break off.
Most drugstore brands use the cheapest ingredients because they are so mass marketed and the cheapest conditioner is wax or plastic.
I do a test scrap with a razor & wet hair, at the sink part off the hair in the middle, hold out a 2 inch section comb it smooth and then take a razor and place it on the hair at 90 degrees ( you must be at 90 or you'll cut the hair) and scrap the razor across the hair a few times and you'll see the wax lift off, I then place the gunk in my palm and show them the wax and they never use Pantene again. - Mags
THE FDA INGREDIENT LISTING AND THE CONSUMER
Today’s consumer is faced with much technical information which may be confusing; ozone friendly claims, biodegradable formulas, natural products, etc. Many judgments are made based on emotion, misinformation, or hearsay rather than sound fact.
Many consumers want to know about cosmetics; who makes them, what’s in them, and how they perform. The Food and Drug Administration has several regulations, one of which requires the listing of cosmetic ingredients on the labels of all retail cosmetic products. The regulation further dictates that this display shall be prominent and use uniform names chosen from recognized sources, principally a Cosmetic Ingredient Dictionary prepared by the Cosmetic, Toiletry and Fragrance Association (CTFA).
These regulations were mandated by the FDA to meet two objectives: 1. The consumer may avoid known allergens by reading the label. 2. The consumer may make value judgments based on ingredient listing.
Redken certainly believes that the consumer has a right to know about cosmetic products. But just as we believe that the care of the hair and skin is best left to someone who is especially trained in the art and science of beauty, so do we believe it is the professional stylist who is best able to discuss the composition of cosmetic products. This is especially true because, as the law now stands, it can cause confusion for the average person who does not have your professional background.
To illustrate this point, let’s look at the difficulties posed by the two objectives behind the regulation.
1 The consumer may avoid known allergens.
Chemical names are confusing to the average consumer. For example, a consumer might be allergic to Vitamin E. In the CTFA Ingredient Dictionary, this compound is listed as Tocopherol. This system of naming cosmetic ingredients is relatively new, so it will require time until chemists, dermatologists, and consumers are familiar with it.
The average consumer might be confused by a series of names like the following, just because they sound alike:
1. sodium salicylate; 2. sodium silicate; 3. sodium stan- nate; 4. sodium stearate; 5. sodium sulfite; 6. sodium sulfanilate.
All of these ingredients have different properties and different purposes in a cosmetic preparation.
The average consumer does not usually know to which ingredient(s) he is allergic. Unless a client has consulted a dermatologist, the ingredient list is really meaningless. Redken has always been happy to work with dermatolo
gists and their patients concerning our products. We will continue this practice.
2. The consumer may make value judgments based on ingredient lists of similar products.
A cosmetic is not simply a mixture of ingredients. Ten different cooks can mix eggs, flour, milk, sugar and shortening and arrive at ten different cakes, some of which would be inedible. A cosmetic should be judged on how it performs, its safety, ease of use, elegance, and the professional company that stands behind it.
With these criteria in mind, Redken’s record is outstanding in the professional salon industry. But questions are certain to arise in comparing ingredient lists, so the following examples are presented as possible areas of difficu Ity.
EXAMPLE I. Cosmetic ingredient listings do not reflect absolute concentrations; only the order of concentration. Consider the following hypothetical formulas:
Ingredient List.....PRO PRODUCTS....DRUGSTORE PRODUCTS
Water.............................64.0%..........................90.0%
Hydrolyzed Protein.......30.0..............................6.0
Cetyl Alcohol.................3.0.................................2.0
Polysorbate-20..............2.0...............................1.0
Fragrance.......................0.7...............................0.7
Preservative...................0.3...............................0.3
The Pro Products have five times the amount of Hydrolyzed Protein and less water, and yet the list of ingredients are identical.

Drugstore Products would be less expensive to produce.
Drugstore products, since they are mass marketed use the least expensive conditioning ingredients as they can, like:
Wax
Plastic PVP
Resin
Petrolatum- petroleum jelly
These build up on the hair, causing the hair within this "Raincoat" to become brittle, because mositure & protein is not absorbed thru the wax & plastic. The hair will become dull and lifeless within 4 months and then it will get brittle & break.

Teach your client's the difference, don't let them get sucked into the ads on TV, the productst will rob them of healthy hair, their haircolor will fade & go off toned and you'll be trying to fight a losing battle.

-Mags Kavanaugh Trichologist AskMags.com

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